Ask the Beasts of the Southern Wild: Exploring Human Identity as Beast, Being and Beholder in Ask the Beasts: Darwin and the God of Love and Beasts of the Southern Wild

Journal of Religion & Film

Abstract
Anthropocentrism and hierarchical dualism together encourage a dangerous anthropology where human primacy among creation and the prioritization of certain humans leads to destruction for all. During a time when suffering caused by climate change continues to intensify, it is increasingly important to find compelling ways to share the stories of those who suffer most. I will explore how Beasts of the Southern Wild (Zeitlin, 2012) contextualizes the ecofeminist theology found in Johnson’s Ask the Beasts: Darwin and the God of Love (2014), specifically the idea of humans identifying as beasts, beings and beholders. Furthermore, I will discuss how the representation of reality in the film is meaningful to viewers because it sacramentalizes the human experience from which Johnson’s theology is born. Through the eyes of Hushpuppy, Beasts of the Southern Wild’s young, female protagonist, viewers realize just how interconnected is the plight of the planet, the poor and all who lack places of privilege.

Recommended Citation

Clary, Stephanie Cherpak
(2018)
“Ask the Beasts of the Southern Wild: Exploring Human Identity as Beast, Being and Beholder in Ask the Beasts: Darwin and the God of Love and Beasts of the Southern Wild,”
Journal of Religion & Film: Vol. 22
:
Iss.
3
, Article 3.
Available at:
https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/jrf/vol22/iss3/3

DOWNLOADS
Since December 14, 2018

COinS

Read More

click
tracking
Share
Share