Recipients of inaugural $100k Jean Mayer Prize in Nutrition Science & Policy announced

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BOSTON (Oct. 22, 2018)—The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University has awarded the school’s inaugural $100,000 Jean Mayer Prize for Excellence in Nutrition Science and Policy to two individuals and two organizations for their collective efforts to raise awareness of the risks of diet-related disease and advocacy for policies that champion better nutrition for younger generations.The Jean Mayer Prize is a new biennial award, supported through a gift to the Friedman School from John Hancock, to recognize outstanding achievement and work in science and/or policy related to food and nutrition. Named for the 10th president of Tufts University and a leading nutrition scientist, the award honors leaders who continue Jean Mayer’s legacy of advocating for policies and programs to reduce hunger and poor nutrition and to improve diet quality for all.
At an Oct. 18 celebration on Tufts’ Boston Health Sciences campus, the 2018 prize was awarded to:
Tom Harkin, who served Iowa’s 5th Congressional District in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1975 to 1985 and was a U.S. senator from 1985 to 2015. During his time in the Senate, Harkin served as chairman of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, and the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry.
Tom Vilsack, 40th governor of Iowa and the nation’s 30th secretary of agriculture. He is now president and CEO of U.S. Dairy Export Council.
The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI), a nonprofit health-advocacy group that focuses on nutrition and food safety. Based in Washington, DC, CSPI represents nearly 500,000 subscribers to its Nutrition Action Healthletter.
Mission: Readiness, an organization including 700+ retired admirals, generals, and other top military leaders that aims to strengthen national security by ensuring children stay in school, stay fit, and stay out of trouble. Their reports on nutrition and military readiness include “Too Fat to Fight” and ” …

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