Research Shows At-Risk Elementary Students Benefit from Child-Centered Play Therapy

Newswire

Oct. 11, 2018

Heidi Wells
Ellen Bennett puts away toys used in play therapy during her internship at Turnbow Elementary School in Springdale.

Elementary school students who received child-centered play therapy services over the course of a school year showed significant positive changes, according to data collected from a research study by two University of Arkansas professors.

Kristi Perryman, assistant professor of counselor education, directs the Office of Play Therapy Research and Training and is a Registered Play Therapist Supervisor. Graduate students in the counselor education program work as interns in local schools to gain practical experience and assist the schools to provide counseling services to children.

Perryman and Lisa Bowers, an assistant professor of communication disorders, received a grant from the provost’s office to implement the program. Both professors are in the College of Education and Health Professions.

The International Journal of Play Therapy published the results of the study in an article titled “Turning the Focus to Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Well-Being: The Impact of Child-Centered Play Therapy.”

The project at Turnbow used the treatment protocol established in the Primary Mental Health Project. One key is that it’s a preventive approach, identifying children at risk for behavioral and emotional problems through a screening process, instead of waiting until children are exhibiting severely disruptive behaviors with failing grades and significant attendance issues.

The school’s professional counselor worked with the faculty and graduate students to screen children in four types of behavior: task orientation, behavioral control, assertiveness and peer/social skills. The results of the study demonstrated significant improvement in all four areas assessed for the students who received services.

“Findings suggest that child centered play therapy is an effective preventative approach for students who are at-risk for developing adverse behaviors that could negatively impact their academic success,” the authors said.

The Primary Mental Health Project was first used as a pilot …

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