Stopping Sepsis

University at Albany University at Albany Research Headlines

Stopping Sepsis 

School of Social Welfare lecturer Al Cardillo, center, accepts the Quality Award for his ongoing collaboration, expertise and work into sepsis education for home health professionals and the public.

ALBANY, N.Y. (July 11, 2018) – When an infection goes unchecked, sepsis – a life-threatening systemic infection – can result. And the majority of sepsis cases begin at home, where diagnosis can take longer.
This is not widely known, and until recently, efforts to combat this deadly disease focused on hospitals, not on identifying sepsis at home.
Al Cardillo, a lecturer in the School of Social Welfare, is leading the efforts to stop sepsis in at-risk patients being cared for at home, and was recently honored for his work. He is a 1981 LMSW alum of the School.
Last month he won a Quality Award from IPRO, a national, non-profit health care measurement and improvement organization, for his ongoing collaboration, expertise and work into sepsis education for home health professionals and the public.
For Cardillo, the question is not why he became passionate on this subject, but how could he not.
“Seeing how this condition can ravage and kill people (the top killer in U.S. hospitals, a major cause of amputations and a vast array of long-term physical, psychosocial and life problems in people throughout New York and the U.S.) and be way under-recognized and not understood not only by the public but by the health care community, how could anyone do anything but respond?” he said.
Cardillo’s passion for educating the public on this issue began when he was contacted by the National Sepsis Alliance to assess the delivery systems for sepsis identification in New York State.
In his role as executive vice president of the Home Care Association of New York, he started to examine the prevalence of sepsis in the home and community.
In his research, he discovered …

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