TAKING AN EARLY BITE OUT OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY: SBUMC RECEIVES $1.33 MILLION FROM DOH TO TARGET PREGNANT WOMEN, INFANTS

Medical Center & Health Care

TAKING AN EARLY BITE OUT OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY: SBUMC RECEIVES $1.33 MILLION FROM DOH TO TARGET PREGNANT WOMEN, INFANTS
The Center for Best Practices Focuses on Screening, Prevention, and Treatment of Obesity

Attending the opening celebration of the Center for Best Practices to Prevent and Reduce Childhood Obesity, a Stony Brook University Medical Center initiative supported by the New York State Department of Health, are, from left: Assemblyman Michael J. Fitzpatrick (R-Smithtown, 7th District); Suffolk County Legislator Vivian Viloria-Fisher (D-5th District); Richard N. Fine, M.D., Dean, Stony Brook University School of Medicine; Josephine Connolly Schoonen, Ph.D., R.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Family Medicine and Director of the Center; Steven L. Strongwater, M.D., CEO, Stony Brook University Medical Center, and Jeffrey S. Trilling, M.D., Chair of Family Medicine.

STONY BROOK, N.Y., November 28, 2007 –  The Department of Family Medicine at Stony Brook University Medical Center received a five-year $1.33 million grant from the New York State Department of Health (DOH) to create a Center for Best Practices to Prevent and Reduce Childhood Obesity. Called the Long Island Center for Pediatric Obesity Prevention Best Practices in Heart Links Communities, the new Center is administered through SBUMC and managed by the Department of Family Medicine. On November 15, SBUMC celebrated the establishment of the Center, which coordinates with healthcare providers in Nassau and Suffolk counties to prevent, treat, and screen for obesity in women of child-bearing years, pregnant women and infants.
According to Richard F. Daines, M.D., State Health Commissioner, childhood obesity has reached “crisis levels” in the state. The DOH reports that obesity is associated with increased prevalence in Type 2 diabetes in children, a form of the disease previously seen only in adults. Obesity also contributes to other chronic diseases, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, joint problems, and some types of cancer.
Recognizing the obesity crisis …

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